Monthly Archives: January 2014

St. Bridget’s Crosses

St. Bridget's Day 1st February

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SAM_1242Bridget is one of Ireland’s earliest recorded saints, and along with St. Patrick, one of our most famous.

A St. Bridget’s cross is usually made from rushes or, less often, straw. It is traditionally believed that the cross protects the home from fire. St. Bridget’s crosses are often made on 1 February and sprinkled with holy water.

There is a legend associated with the origin of St. Bridget’s crosses.  Bridget was called to the bedside of a dying pagan chieftain.  She sat by him to keep watch over him in his final hours.

While sitting by the dying man, Bridget picked up some rushes from the floor and began to weave them into a cross.  The sick man asked her what she was making and Bridget began to explain the story of Jesus to him.  Before he died, the chieftain had become a Christian.

Our class (Ms. Nolan’s 3rd) created St. Bridget’s Crosses from rushes for St. Bridget’s Day.

Kickboxing

Well done to Alex Fitzpatrick, sixth class, who was crowned the  IKF British Open U13 Kickboxing Champion recently. Alex traveled to Kent, England, full of confidence, after having earned a silver medal in The Irish Kickboxing Open, last November, in Waterford. In fact he was the only competitor to represent Ireland. Alex met a tough…

Gordon D’Arcy visits St.Pats

On Thursday 23rd and Friday 24th of January, the environmental artist Gordon D’Arcy visited St.Pats. He treated some classes to wonderful walks around the town. Gordon pointed out features of nature that we pass by everyday without noticing. Some classes visited Temple Jarlath while others followed a nature trail down by the river Nanny. On…

Tutankhamun

Ms. Nolan’s 3rd Class learned all about Tutankhamun.  Here is part of the lesson we learned. Tutankhamun was born around 1341 BC.  He became a Pharaoh at nine years old.  He died around the year 1323 BC when he was about eighteen years old.  Most Pharaohs’ tombs were huge, but Tutankhamun’s was so small that…